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Entry points are usually designated by an oscillator (RSI, CCI etc) and exit points are calculated based on a positive risk-reward ratio. Using stop level distances, traders can either equal that distance or exceed it to maintain a positive risk-reward ratio e.g. If the stop level was placed 50 pips away, the take profit level wold be set at 50 pips or more away from the entry point.
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You can read more about technical indicators by checking out our education section or through the trading platforms we offer. The best forex trading strategies for beginners are the simple, well-established strategies that have worked for a huge list of successful forex traders already. Through trial and error you should be able to learn Forex trading strategies that best suit your own style. Go ahead and try out your strategies risk-free with our demo trading account.
Using the (CCI) as a tool to time entries, notice how each time CCI dipped below -100 (highlighted in blue), prices responded with a rally. Not all trades will work out this way, but because the trend is being followed, each dip caused more buyers to come into the market and push prices higher. In conclusion, identifying a strong trend is important for a fruitful trend trading strategy.

It's important to remember when looking at forex that a higher currency makes a country's exports more expensive for other countries, while making imports cheaper. A lower currency makes exports cheaper and imports more expensive, so foreign exchange rates play a significant part in determining the trading relationship between two countries. There are a variety of factors at play in this relationship and they all contribute in some way to whether the strength of a currency declines or improves in relation to another. Understanding the influencing factors gives traders insights they can incorporate into their forex trading strategies. 

The EUR/USD 10 minute above shows a typical example of a scalping strategy. The long-term trend is confirmed by the moving average (price above 200 MA). The smaller time frame is then used to target entry/exit points. Timing of entry points are featured by the red rectangle in the bias of the trader (long). Traders can also close long positions using the MACD when the MACD (blue line) crosses over the signal line (red line) highlighted by the blue rectangles.


If traders are positive on the prospects for the Yen, they would expect the number on the right to go down – i.e. the Yen would be getting stronger against the Dollar. Traders would be buying less Yen with a Dollar as the Yen got stronger. Similarly, if the Yen was expected to weaken, forex traders would expect the Yen number to go up, reflecting the fact that the dollar could buy more yen.
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