Forex is always traded in pairs – for example AUD/USD. You speculate on whether the price of one country's currency will rise or fall against the currency of another country, and take a position accordingly. Looking at the AUD/USD currency pair, the first currency (AUD) is called the 'base currency' and the second currency (USD) is known as the 'counter currency'. 

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To easily compare the forex strategies on the three criteria, we've laid them out in a bubble chart. On the vertical axis is ‘Risk-Reward Ratio’ with strategies at the top of the graph having higher reward for the risk taken on each trade. Position trading typically is the strategy with the highest risk reward ratio. On the horizontal axis is time investment that represents how much time is required to actively monitor the trades. The strategy that demands the most in terms of your time resource is scalp trading due to the high frequency of trades being placed on a regular basis.
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Arbitrage is based on the premise of the forex trader trying to make a gain from small differences (of the currency) that exist either in the same or different markets. This is primarily a form of speculation. Identifying the right conditions and employing this strategy is not an easy task. Arbitrage strategy best market participants who have best technology systems and have quickest access to information. Arbitrage is best employed when the same currency has two different prices.
Some of the other best forex trading strategies are based on the technical analysis. This method is particularly important in day trading. Technical analysis is useful to traders in that it gives them an indication of times when they can enter or exit the market. It also helps the trader to make the most out of the existing market status. Given below are brief explanations of some of the technical analysis based trading strategies.
What happens when the market approaches recent lows? Put simply, buyers will be attracted to what they regard as cheap. What happens when the market approaches recent highs? Sellers will be attracted to what they view as either expensive, or a good place to lock in a profit. Therefore, recent highs and lows are the yardstick by which current prices are evaluated.
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