Price action trading involves the study of historical prices to formulate technical trading strategies. Price action can be used as a stand-alone technique or in conjunction with an indicator. Fundamentals are seldom used; however, it is not unheard of to incorporate economic events as a substantiating factor. There are several other strategies that fall within the price action bracket as outlined above.

One potentially beneficial and profitable Forex trading strategy is the 4-hour trend following strategy. However, the 4-hour timeframe makes it more suitable for swing traders. This strategy uses a 4-hour base chart to screen for potential trading signal locations. The 1-hour chart is used as the signal chart, to determine where the actual positions will be taken.
Stochastics are then used to identify entry points by looking for oversold signals highlighted by the blue rectangles on the stochastic and chart. Risk management is the final step whereby the ATR gives an indication of stop levels. The ATR figure is highlighted by the red circles. This figure represents the approximate number of pips away the stop level should be set. For example, if the ATR reads 41.8 (reflected in the last ATR reading) the trader would look to place the stop 41.8 pips away from entry. At DailyFX, we recommend trading with a positive risk-reward ratio at a minimum of 1:2. This would mean setting a take profit level (limit) at least 83.6 (41.8 x 2) pips away or further.
Investing in CMC Markets derivative products carries significant risks and is not suitable for all investors. You could lose more than your deposits. You do not own, or have any interest in, the underlying assets. We recommend that you seek independent advice and ensure you fully understand the risks involved before trading. Spreads may widen dependent on liquidity and market volatility.

The real-time Economic Calendar covers financial events and indicators from all over the world. It's automatically updated when new data is released. The Real-time Economic Calendar only provides general information and it is not meant to be a trading guide. FXStreet commits to offer the most accurate contents but due to the large amount of data and the wide range of official sources, FXStreet cannot be held responsible for the eventual inaccuracies that might occur. The Real-time Economic Calendar may also be subject to change without any previous notice.


Some of the other best forex trading strategies are based on the technical analysis. This method is particularly important in day trading. Technical analysis is useful to traders in that it gives them an indication of times when they can enter or exit the market. It also helps the trader to make the most out of the existing market status. Given below are brief explanations of some of the technical analysis based trading strategies.

A forex trading strategy works really well when traders follow the rules. But just like anything else, one particular strategy may not always be a one-size-fits-all approach, so what works today may not necessarily work tomorrow. If a strategy isn't proving to be profitable and isn't producing the desired results, traders may consider the following before changing a game plan: 
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The information on Forex Factory is sourced in from Fair Economy and relayed in real time. Micro movements are also monitored by the broker partners of the platform. Forex Factory follows standard candlestick charts of multiple durations ranging from 1 minute to 1 month. There are 28 forex instruments available to trade on Forex Factory that are offered by its different broker partners.

Using the (CCI) as a tool to time entries, notice how each time CCI dipped below -100 (highlighted in blue), prices responded with a rally. Not all trades will work out this way, but because the trend is being followed, each dip caused more buyers to come into the market and push prices higher. In conclusion, identifying a strong trend is important for a fruitful trend trading strategy.


Political instability and poor economic performance can also have a negative impact on a currency. Politically stable countries with robust economic performance will always be more appealing to foreign investors, so these countries will draw investment away from countries characterised by more economic or political risk. Furthermore, a country showing a sharp decline in economic performance will experience a loss of confidence in its currency and a movement of capital to currencies of more economically steady countries. These are just two simple examples of what can affect foreign exchange rates and the kind of things traders consider when developing forex trading strategies.  
A combination of the stochastic oscillator, ATR indicator and the moving average was used in the example above to illustrate a typical swing trading strategy. The upward trend was initially identified using the 50-day moving average (price above MA line). In the case of an uptrend, traders will look to enter long positions with the old adage of ‘buy low, sell high’.
Strong trending markets work best for carry trades as the strategy involves a lengthier time horizon. Confirmation of the trend should be the first step prior to placing the trade (higher highs and higher lows and vice versa) – refer to Example 1 above. There are two aspects to a carry trade namely, exchange rate risk and interest rate risk. Accordingly, the best time to open the positions is at the start of a trend to capitalise fully on the exchange rate fluctuation. Regarding the interest rate component, this will remain the same regardless of the trend as the trader will still receive the interest rate differential if the first named currency has a higher interest rate against the second named currency e.g. AUD/JPY.
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