Forex is one of the most widely traded markets in the world, with a total daily average turnover reported to exceed $5 trillion a day. The forex market is not based in a central location or exchange, and is open 24 hours a day from Sunday night through to Friday night. A wide range of currencies are constantly being exchanged as individuals, companies and organisations conduct global business and attempt to take advantage of rate fluctuations.
Sometimes a market breaks out of a range, moving below the support or above the resistance to start a trend. How does this happen? When support breaks down and a market moves to new lows, buyers begin to hold off. This is because buyers are constantly noticing cheaper prices being established and want to wait for a bottom to be reached. At the same time, there will be traders who are selling in panic or simply being forced out of their positions.
The ‘Elliot Wave Theory’, named after Ralph Elliot, is one of the oldest forex strategies. He analyzed the stock price data for around 70 years and found out that human psychology (emotions, fear and greed) drove the market and that it moved iteratively. This is to say that the market switches between optimistic and pessimistic modes. In this strategy, the motive phase unfurls in 5 steps.
Leveraged trading in foreign currency or off-exchange products on margin carries significant risk and may not be suitable for all investors. We advise you to carefully consider whether trading is appropriate for you based on your personal circumstances. Forex trading involves risk. Losses can exceed deposits. We recommend that you seek independent advice and ensure you fully understand the risks involved before trading.
When trading forex, you always speculate on whether the price of the base currency will rise or fall against the counter currency. So in AUD/USD if you think AUD will rise against USD, you go long (buy) the currency pair. Alternatively, if you think AUD will fall against USD (or that USD will rise against AUD), you go short (sell) the currency pair.
For this strategy, we will use the Exponential Moving Average (EMA) indicator. The previous week's last daily candlestick has to be closed at a level above the EMA value. Now we have to look for the moment when the previous week's maximum level was broken. Next, a buy stop order is placed on the H4 closed candlestick, at the price level of the broken level.
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