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Strong trending markets work best for carry trades as the strategy involves a lengthier time horizon. Confirmation of the trend should be the first step prior to placing the trade (higher highs and higher lows and vice versa) – refer to Example 1 above. There are two aspects to a carry trade namely, exchange rate risk and interest rate risk. Accordingly, the best time to open the positions is at the start of a trend to capitalise fully on the exchange rate fluctuation. Regarding the interest rate component, this will remain the same regardless of the trend as the trader will still receive the interest rate differential if the first named currency has a higher interest rate against the second named currency e.g. AUD/JPY.

Within price action, there is range, trend, day, scalping, swing and position trading. These strategies adhere to different forms of trading requirements which will be outlined in detail below. The examples show varying techniques to trade these strategies to show just how diverse trading can be, along with a variety of bespoke options for traders to choose from.


Locating the trend: Markets trend and consolidate, and this process repeats in cycles. The first principle of this style is to find the long drawn out moves within the forex markets. One way to identify forex trends is by studying 180 periods worth of forex data. Identifying the swing highs and lows will be the next step. By referencing this price data on the current charts, you will be able to identify the market direction.
The EUR/USD 10 minute above shows a typical example of a scalping strategy. The long-term trend is confirmed by the moving average (price above 200 MA). The smaller time frame is then used to target entry/exit points. Timing of entry points are featured by the red rectangle in the bias of the trader (long). Traders can also close long positions using the MACD when the MACD (blue line) crosses over the signal line (red line) highlighted by the blue rectangles.
Stochastics are then used to identify entry points by looking for oversold signals highlighted by the blue rectangles on the stochastic and chart. Risk management is the final step whereby the ATR gives an indication of stop levels. The ATR figure is highlighted by the red circles. This figure represents the approximate number of pips away the stop level should be set. For example, if the ATR reads 41.8 (reflected in the last ATR reading) the trader would look to place the stop 41.8 pips away from entry. At DailyFX, we recommend trading with a positive risk-reward ratio at a minimum of 1:2. This would mean setting a take profit level (limit) at least 83.6 (41.8 x 2) pips away or further.
There is an additional rule for trading when the market state is more favourable to the system. This rule is designed to filter out breakouts that go against the long-term trend. In short, you look at the 25-day moving average (MA) and the 300-day moving average. The direction of the shorter moving average determines the direction that is permitted. This rule states that you can only go:
If traders are positive on the prospects for the Yen, they would expect the number on the right to go down – i.e. the Yen would be getting stronger against the Dollar. Traders would be buying less Yen with a Dollar as the Yen got stronger. Similarly, if the Yen was expected to weaken, forex traders would expect the Yen number to go up, reflecting the fact that the dollar could buy more yen.

There is an additional rule for trading when the market state is more favourable to the system. This rule is designed to filter out breakouts that go against the long-term trend. In short, you look at the 25-day moving average (MA) and the 300-day moving average. The direction of the shorter moving average determines the direction that is permitted. This rule states that you can only go:

Some of the other best forex trading strategies are based on the technical analysis. This method is particularly important in day trading. Technical analysis is useful to traders in that it gives them an indication of times when they can enter or exit the market. It also helps the trader to make the most out of the existing market status. Given below are brief explanations of some of the technical analysis based trading strategies.
The forex trading strategy Carry Trade is different from other forex strategies. While most of the Forex trading strategies follow the concept “buy low/sell high”, Carry Trade relies mainly on the difference in interest rate between the currencies. This means that forex traders can make profit even if the market is stable. When employing this strategy, traders buy a currency with a high differential ratio, meaning the interest rate of the currency they buy will be higher than that of the currency they sell.

Entry points are usually designated by an oscillator (RSI, CCI etc) and exit points are calculated based on a positive risk-reward ratio. Using stop level distances, traders can either equal that distance or exceed it to maintain a positive risk-reward ratio e.g. If the stop level was placed 50 pips away, the take profit level wold be set at 50 pips or more away from the entry point.

High Risk Investment Warning: Trading FX/CFDs on margin carries a high level of risk, and may not be suitable for all investors. Leverage can work against you. Before deciding to trade FX/CFDs offered by FXCM Australia Pty. Limited ("FXCM AU" or "FXCM Australia") you should carefully consider your objectives, financial situation, needs, and level of experience. By trading, you could sustain a loss in excess of your deposited funds. Before trading FX/CFDs you should be aware of all the risks associated with trading FXCM products and read and consider the Financial Services Guide, Product Disclosure Statement, and Terms of Business issued by FXCM AU. FX/CFDs products are only suitable for those customers who fully understand the market risk. FXCM provides general advice that does not take into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. The content of this website must not be construed as personal advice. FXCM recommends you seek advice from a separate financial advisor. For any questions or to obtain a copy of any documents, contact FXCM at [email protected] FXCM AU is regulated by ASIC [AFSL 309763]. FXCM AU ACN: 121934432.
Trading foreign exchange on margin carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. The high degree of leverage can work against you as well as for you. Before deciding to trade foreign exchange you should carefully consider your investment objectives, level of experience and risk appetite. The possibility exists that you could sustain a loss of some or all of your initial investment and therefore you should not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. You should be aware of all the risks associated with foreign exchange trading and seek advice from an independent financial advisor if you have any doubts.
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