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What happens when the market approaches recent lows? Put simply, buyers will be attracted to what they regard as cheap. What happens when the market approaches recent highs? Sellers will be attracted to what they view as either expensive, or a good place to lock in a profit. Therefore, recent highs and lows are the yardstick by which current prices are evaluated.
For all economic calendar indicators, you will find the Previous number: that is the data in its last release (frequency of data release is variable: it can be last month, last trimester…). For most indicators, we add a Consensus number: that is a general agreement of experts on the outcome of the number. When the Actual data is released, it’s immediately displayed at the right of the volatility indicator. Better or worse than expected? If we had a consensus published, it comes either in green (it means the data is better than expected) or in red (worse than expected). The Deviation ratio is an FXStreet exclusive calculation which measures the surprise caused by an event when the Actual data differs from the Consensus. Its number usually oscillates in an open scale between -7 and +7. 
Currency markets are important to a broad range of participants, from banks, brokers, hedge funds and investor traders who trade FX. Any company that operates or has customers overseas will need to trade currency. Central banks can also be active in currency markets, as they seek to keep the currency they are responsible for trading within a specific range.
If traders are positive on the prospects for the Yen, they would expect the number on the right to go down – i.e. the Yen would be getting stronger against the Dollar. Traders would be buying less Yen with a Dollar as the Yen got stronger. Similarly, if the Yen was expected to weaken, forex traders would expect the Yen number to go up, reflecting the fact that the dollar could buy more yen.
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