The ‘Elliot Wave Theory’, named after Ralph Elliot, is one of the oldest forex strategies. He analyzed the stock price data for around 70 years and found out that human psychology (emotions, fear and greed) drove the market and that it moved iteratively. This is to say that the market switches between optimistic and pessimistic modes. In this strategy, the motive phase unfurls in 5 steps.


When trading forex, you always speculate on whether the price of the base currency will rise or fall against the counter currency. So in AUD/USD if you think AUD will rise against USD, you go long (buy) the currency pair. Alternatively, if you think AUD will fall against USD (or that USD will rise against AUD), you go short (sell) the currency pair.
The factors mentioned above can also cause a currency to decline. For example, the currency of a country with low inflation will generally rise because that country's purchasing power is higher relative to other currencies. Even natural disasters such as earthquakes or tsunamis, which put a strain on a nation’s economy, can have a negative impact on a currency.
However, it's important to note that tight reins are needed on the risk management side. These Forex trade strategies rely on support and resistance levels holding. But there is also a risk of large downsides when these levels break down. Constant monitoring of the market is a good idea. The market state that best suits this type of strategy is stable and volatile. This sort of market environment offers healthy price swings that are constrained within a range. It's important to note that the market can switch states.
There is an additional rule for trading when the market state is more favourable to the system. This rule is designed to filter out breakouts that go against the long-term trend. In short, you look at the 25-day moving average (MA) and the 300-day moving average. The direction of the shorter moving average determines the direction that is permitted. This rule states that you can only go:
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Traders who have chased the price as it bounces upward and have often suffered losses because of a sudden reversal would want to keep this strategy in their minds when trading currencies. By employing this simple strategy, they can determine whether the price will continue in the breakout direction or not. This helps them to increase their profits or reduce losses.

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