Day trading - These are trades that are exited before the end of the day, as the name suggests. This removes the chance of being adversely affected by large moves overnight. Day trading strategies are usually the perfect forex trading strategies for beginners. Trades may last only a few hours, and price bars on charts might typically be set to one or two minutes. The 50-pips a day forex strategy is a good example of a day trading strategy.
Strong trending markets work best for carry trades as the strategy involves a lengthier time horizon. Confirmation of the trend should be the first step prior to placing the trade (higher highs and higher lows and vice versa) – refer to Example 1 above. There are two aspects to a carry trade namely, exchange rate risk and interest rate risk. Accordingly, the best time to open the positions is at the start of a trend to capitalise fully on the exchange rate fluctuation. Regarding the interest rate component, this will remain the same regardless of the trend as the trader will still receive the interest rate differential if the first named currency has a higher interest rate against the second named currency e.g. AUD/JPY. 

If traders are positive on the prospects for the Yen, they would expect the number on the right to go down – i.e. the Yen would be getting stronger against the Dollar. Traders would be buying less Yen with a Dollar as the Yen got stronger. Similarly, if the Yen was expected to weaken, forex traders would expect the Yen number to go up, reflecting the fact that the dollar could buy more yen.
Many forex traders start with a simple trading strategy. For example, they may notice that a specific currency pair tends to rebound from a particular support or resistance level. They may then decide to add other elements that improve the accuracy of these trading signals over time. For instance, they may require that the price rebound from a specific support level by a certain percentage or number of pips.
Disclaimer: Any Advice or information on this website is General Advice Only - It does not take into account your personal circumstances, please do not trade or invest based solely on this information. By Viewing any material or using the information within this site you agree that this is general education material and you will not hold any person or entity responsible for loss or damages resulting from the content or general advice provided here by Learn To Trade The Market Pty Ltd, it's employees, directors or fellow members. Futures, options, and spot currency trading have large potential rewards, but also large potential risk. You must be aware of the risks and be willing to accept them in order to invest in the futures and options markets. Don't trade with money you can't afford to lose. This website is neither a solicitation nor an offer to Buy/Sell futures, spot forex, cfd's, options or other financial products. No representation is being made that any account will or is likely to achieve profits or losses similar to those discussed in any material on this website. The past performance of any trading system or methodology is not necessarily indicative of future results.
Entry points are usually designated by an oscillator (RSI, CCI etc) and exit points are calculated based on a positive risk-reward ratio. Using stop level distances, traders can either equal that distance or exceed it to maintain a positive risk-reward ratio e.g. If the stop level was placed 50 pips away, the take profit level wold be set at 50 pips or more away from the entry point.
Forex Factory is an online foreign exchange trading platform that connects traders and brokers. The brand also offers a lucid interface with lots of unique features for news-based trading. The platform is highly social and it connects its users through a private members’ forum where you can share your ideas and trades. Forex Factory features simple spread-charting with data sourced from multiple brokers all over the world. It offers trading in all major currency combinations.
The forex market is a very volatile market. When the market is volatile, traders get lessons on how to hedge, develop and acquire broad/diverse portfolios, and act on low leverage to exploit the prevailing market condition. There are two different types of volatility. They are historical and implied volatility. The former refers to the normal price action with respect to a period of time (say, a month or year). Abnormal current and future price action is referred to as implied volatility. It often exceeds the historical range when compared with the historical price action.
There is an additional rule for trading when the market state is more favourable to the system. This rule is designed to filter out breakouts that go against the long-term trend. In short, you look at the 25-day moving average (MA) and the 300-day moving average. The direction of the shorter moving average determines the direction that is permitted. This rule states that you can only go:

Forex is always traded in pairs – for example AUD/USD. You speculate on whether the price of one country's currency will rise or fall against the currency of another country, and take a position accordingly. Looking at the AUD/USD currency pair, the first currency (AUD) is called the 'base currency' and the second currency (USD) is known as the 'counter currency'. 
What happens when the market approaches recent lows? Put simply, buyers will be attracted to what they regard as cheap. What happens when the market approaches recent highs? Sellers will be attracted to what they view as either expensive, or a good place to lock in a profit. Therefore, recent highs and lows are the yardstick by which current prices are evaluated.
×