Now, let’s say you open a trade worth $50,000 with the same trading account size and leverage ratio. Your required margin for this trade would be $500 (1% of your position size), and your free margin would now also amount to $500. In other words, you could withstand a negative price fluctuation of $500 until your free margin falls to zero and causes a margin call. Your position size of $50,000 could only fall to $49,500 – this would be the largest loss your trading account could withstand.
Leveraged trading in foreign currency or off-exchange products on margin carries significant risk and may not be suitable for all investors. We advise you to carefully consider whether trading is appropriate for you based on your personal circumstances. Forex trading involves risk. Losses can exceed deposits. We recommend that you seek independent advice and ensure you fully understand the risks involved before trading.

As you may now come to understand, FX margins are one of the key aspects of Forex trading that must not be overlooked, as they can potentially lead to unpleasant outcomes. In order to avoid them, you should understand the theory concerning margins, margin levels and margin calls, and apply your trading experience to create a viable Forex strategy. Indeed a well developed approach will undoubtedly lead you to trading success in the end.

There are benefits to be had of planning your Forex trading well in advance. In fact most experienced traders will allocate a little time on Saturday or Sunday putting together their weekday trading schedule. In this article we take a look at how the benefits of putting together your own unique trading schedule to ensure you know just when, why and what Forex you will be trading in the week ahead.
Margin is one of the most important concepts of Forex trading. However, a lot of people don't understand its significance, or simply misunderstand the term. A Forex margin is basically a good faith deposit that is needed to maintain open positions. A margin is not a fee or a transaction cost, but instead, a portion of your account equity set aside and assigned as a margin deposit.
Trading on a margin can have varying consequences. It can influence your trading experience both positively and negatively, with both profits and losses potentially being seriously augmented. Your broker takes your margin deposit and then pools it with someone else's margin Forex deposits. Brokers do this in order to be able to place trades within the whole interbank network.
Imagine that you have $10,000 on your account account, and you have a losing position with a margin evaluated at $1,000. If your position goes against you, and it goes to a $9,000 loss, the equity will be $1,000 (i.e $10,000 - $9,000), which equals the margin. Thus, the margin level will be 100%. Again, if the margin level reaches the rate of 100%, you can't take any new positions, unless the market suddenly turns around and your equity level turns out to be greater than the margin.
Profit factor on the forex robot trading account statement. Profit factor is the gross profit / gross loss. E.g Profit of $6000 and a loss of $3000 would give a profit factor of 2.0. This means that for every $1 risked, you can expect a return of $2. If a forex robot has a profit factor less than 1, eg profit factor of 0.7, this means that for every $1 you can expect $0.70 back (the forex robot is a losing one!). If a forex robot has a high profit factor, it is a good one – eg profit factor of 6.0 ($6 gained for every $1 risked). You can click this table heading to rank the table of forex robots by the profit factor to see what are the best forex robots with the highest profit factor.
Margin calls are mechanisms put in place by your Forex broker in order to keep your used margin secure. Remember, your used margin is allocated by your broker as the collateral for funds borrowed from your broker. A margin call happens when your free margin falls to zero, and all you have left in your trading account is your used, or required margin. When this happens, your broker will automatically close all open positions at current market rates.
Retail or beginning traders often trade currency in micro lots, because one pip in a micro lot represents only a 10-cent move in the price. This makes losses easier to manage if a trade doesn't produce the intended results. In a mini lot, one pip equals $1 and that same one pip in a standard lot equals $10. Some currencies move as much as 100 pips or more in a single trading session making the potential losses to the small investor much more manageable by trading in micro or mini lots.
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