Maintenance margin for commodities is the amount that you must maintain in your account to support the futures contract and represents the lowest level to which your account can drop before you must deposit additional funds. Commodities positions are marked to market daily, with your account adjusted for any profit or loss that occurs. Because the price of underlying commodities fluctuates, it is possible that the value of the commodity may decline to the point at which your account balance falls below the required maintenance margin. If this happens, brokers typically make a margin call, which means you must deposit additional funds to meet the margin requirement.
However, what must be remembered is that the majority of robots trade within a certain range. They make a particular amount of pips inside the tight range, during the slowest time on the Forex market, and they regularly set a few pip targets, and may not even use a stop-loss. They can be classed as successful, as they do tend to make profits in each trade, even if it is only a few.

What's more, even online robot merchants try to move their robots in rank by claiming that their opponents' ones are scams. A lot are advertised with false claims by people who have made serious money applying these systems. The truth however, is that a great number of investors and traders have lost a lot of money using so called 'free' Forex robots that work. There have even been circumstances in which whole accounts have been wiped out.
There is one unpleasant fact for you to take into consideration about the margin call Forex. You might not even receive the margin call before your positions are liquidated. If the money in your account falls under the margin requirements, your broker will close some or all positions, as we have specified earlier in this article. This can actually help prevent your account from falling into a negative balance.
Trading on margin can be a profitable Forex strategy, but it is important to understand all the possible risks. You should make sure you know how your margin account operates, and be sure to read the margin agreement between you and your selected broker. If there is anything you are unclear about in your agreement, ask questions and make sure everything is clear.
These articles, on the other hand, discuss currency trading as buying and selling currency on the foreign exchange (or "Forex") market with the intent to make money, often called "speculative forex trading". XE does not offer speculative forex trading, nor do we recommend any firms that offer this service. These articles are provided for general information only.
Trading on margin refers to trading on money borrowed from your broker in order to substantially increase your market exposure. When opening a margin trade, your broker lends you a certain sum of money depending on the leverage ratio used, and allocates a small portion of your trading account as the collateral, or margin for that trade. The remaining funds in your trading account will act as your free margin, which can be used to withstand negative price fluctuations from your existing leveraged positions, or to open new leveraged trades. The relation between your free margin and other important elements of your trading account, such as your balance and equity, will be explained later. For now, it’s important to understand the meaning of margin in Forex.
Borrowing money to purchase securities is known as "buying on margin". When an investor borrows money from his broker to buy a stock, he must open a margin account with his broker, sign a related agreement and abide by the broker's margin requirements. The loan in the account is collateralized by investor's securities and cash. If the value of the stock drops too much, the investor must deposit more cash in his account, or sell a portion of the stock.
Forex trading is the largest market in the world, with nearly $2 trillion traded on a daily basis. There are many factors that can contribute to changes in the value of a currency. Some of these factors include terms of trade, sometimes referred to as the balance of trade, which is when there's an improvement in the terms of the trade thanks to the price of a country's exports being higher than the prices of its imports. Other facts include differences in inflation rates, which basically involve the value of the currency, and public debt, which typically occurs when foreign investors lose confidence in the economy and make fewer or no investments and leads to inflation and devaluation of the home country's currency.
So, for an investor who wants to trade $100,000, a 1% margin would mean that $1,000 needs to be deposited into the account. The remaining 99% is provided by the broker. No interest is paid directly on this borrowed amount, but if the investor does not close their position before the delivery date, it will have to be rolled over. In that case, interest may be charged depending on the investor's position (long or short) and the short-term interest rates of the underlying currencies.
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