Brokers use margin levels in an attempt to detect whether FX traders can take any new positions or not. Different brokers have varying limits for the margin level, but most will set this limit at 100%. This limit is called a margin call level. Technically, a 100% margin call level means that when your account margin level reaches 100%, you can still close your positions, but you cannot take any new positions.
One thing is likely - their developers can potentially become millionaires. Smart designers are aware that people yearn to make a lot of money, and try to ensure that robot Forex trading appears to be one of the finest ways that they can achieve this. Nonetheless, they exploit this as a possibility to design a robot, or any other software (or even a DVD, webinar, seminar, e-book etc) to sell and prosper.

A Portfolio Margin account can provide lower margin requirements than a Margin account. However, for a portfolio with concentrated risk, the requirements under Portfolio Margin may be greater than those under Margin, as the true economic risk behind the portfolio may not be adequately accounted for under the static Reg T calculations used for Margin accounts. Customers can compare their current Reg T margin requirements for their portfolio with those current projected under Portfolio Margin rules by clicking the Try PM button from the Account Window in Trader Workstation (demo or customer account).
If the robots they sell could actually make a huge amount of money through trading the currencies, then what is the point in selling them to others and not utilising them on their own Forex accounts? The answer is logical - robots can barely make money for a Forex trader. Can a $99 FX robot or a free Forex robot really make hundreds or thousands of dollars every month? If it could, you have to ask yourself - would it really be sold for such a relatively low price?
All information on The Forex Geek website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to provide financial advice. Any statements about profits or income, expressed or implied, do not represent a guarantee. Your actual trading may result in losses as no trading system is guaranteed. You accept full responsibilities for your actions, trades, profit or loss, and agree to hold The Forex Geek and any authorized distributors of this information harmless in any and all ways. No representation is being made that any account will or is likely to achieve profits or losses similar to those shown. In fact, there are frequently sharp differences between hypothetical performance results and the actual results subsequently achieved by any particular trading program. Hypothetical trading does not involve financial risk, and no hypothetical trading record can completely account for the impact of financial risk in actual trading. This site provides unbiased reviews and may be compensated through third party advertisers. This compensation is not an endorsement or recommendation and TheForexGeek.com is not responsible for these websites. Your usage of The Forex Geek Website serves as your acknowledgement and representation that you have read and understood these TERMS OF USE and that you agree to be bound by such TERMS OF USE (“Agreement”). You accept that the agreement can be changed at any time and that you must comply with any changes made to the agreement.

All currency trading is done in pairs. Unlike the stock market, where you can buy or sell a single stock, you have to buy one currency and sell another currency in the forex market. Next, nearly all currencies are priced out to the fourth decimal point. A pip or percentage in point is the smallest increment of trade. One pip typically equals 1/100 of 1 percent.


Let's take a couple of moments to review what we've learned! Currency trading, often referred to as foreign exchange or Forex, is the purchasing and selling of currencies in the foreign exchange marketplace, and is done with the objective of making profits. Because it is liquid, currency trading differs from other types of trading. Currency exchanges are expressed in currency pairs (two different currencies together), using a format that expresses both the country and the type of money.
Let’s cover this with an example. If you have $1,000 in your trading account and use a leverage of 1:100 you could theoretically open a position size of $100,000. However, by doing so, your entire trading account would be allocated as the required margin for the trade, and even a single price tick against you would lead to a margin call. There would be no free margin to withstand any negative price fluctuation.
So, for an investor who wants to trade $100,000, a 1% margin would mean that $1,000 needs to be deposited into the account. The remaining 99% is provided by the broker. No interest is paid directly on this borrowed amount, but if the investor does not close their position before the delivery date, it will have to be rolled over. In that case, interest may be charged depending on the investor's position (long or short) and the short-term interest rates of the underlying currencies. 
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