Live Spreads Widget: Dynamic live spreads are available on Active Trader commission-based accounts. When static spreads are displayed, the figures are time-weighted averages derived from tradable prices at FXCM from July 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019. Spreads are variable and are subject to delay. The spread figures are for informational purposes only. FXCM is not liable for errors, omissions or delays, or for actions relying on this information.


With Equivolume, you can plot price and volume activity on a single graph, instead of having volume added as an indicator on the side. This tool draws the bars following their traded volume at a precise point in time (the wider the bar, the bigger the volume). That creates a clear visualization of the volume increase or decrease of an asset’s diagram. A very handy feature for those strategies whose key factor is volume. How to change your table into Equivolume
With Equivolume, you can plot price and volume activity on a single graph, instead of having volume added as an indicator on the side. This tool draws the bars following their traded volume at a precise point in time (the wider the bar, the bigger the volume). That creates a clear visualization of the volume increase or decrease of an asset’s diagram. A very handy feature for those strategies whose key factor is volume. How to change your table into Equivolume

Clearly, leverage should be used judiciously, but even with relatively conservative 10:1 leverage, the 7.5% yield on NZD/JPY pair would translate into a 75% return on an annual basis. So, if you were to hold a 100,000 unit position in NZD/JPY using $5,000 worth of equity, you would earn $9.40 in interest every day. That’s $94 dollars in interest after only 10 days, $940 worth of interest after three months, or $3,760 annually. Not too shabby given the fact that the same amount of money would only earn you $250 in a bank savings account (with a rate of 5% interest) after a whole year. The only real edge the bank account provides is that the $250 return would be risk-free. 


In the world of trading, it means you can access a larger portion of the market with a smaller deposit than you would be able to via traditional investing. This gives you the advantage of getting greater returns for a small up-front investment, though it is important to note that traders can be at risk of higher losses when using leverage. In finance, it is when you borrow money, to invest and make more money due to your increased buying power. Once you return what you borrowed, you are still left with more money than if you had just invested your own capital.
The carry trade opportunity was also seen in USD/JPY in 2005. Between January and December of that year, the currency rallied from 102 to a high of 121.40 before ending at 117.80. This is equal to an appreciation from low to high of 19%, which was far more attractive than the 2.9% return in the S&P 500 during that same year. In addition, at the time, the interest rate spread between the U.S. dollar and the Japanese yen averaged around 3.25%. Unleveraged, this means that a trader could have earned as much as 22.25% over the course of the year. Introduce 10:1 leverage, and that could be as much as 220% gain.
The bottom line is that you want to pick carry trades that benefit not only from a positive and growing yield, but that also have the potential to appreciate in value. This is important because just as currency appreciation can increase the value of your carry trade earnings, currency depreciation can erase all of your carry trade gains – and then some. 
When scalping, traders tend to employ a leverage that starts at 50:1 and may go as high as 500:1. Knowing the effect of leveraging and the optimal leverage Forex trading ratio is vital for a successful trading strategy, as you never want to overtrade, but you always want to be able to squeeze the maximum out of potentially profitable trades. Usually a trader is advised to experiment with leverage within their strategy for a while, in order to find the most suitable one.
In forex, investors use leverage to profit from the fluctuations in exchange rates between two different countries. The leverage that is achievable in the forex market is one of the highest that investors can obtain. Leverage is activated through a loan that is provided to an investor by the broker that is handling the investor’s or trader’s forex account.
HIGH RISK WARNING: Foreign exchange trading carries a high level of risk that may not be suitable for all investors. Leverage creates additional risk and loss exposure. Before you decide to trade foreign exchange, carefully consider your investment objectives, experience level, and risk tolerance. You could lose some or all of your initial investment; do not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. Educate yourself on the risks associated with foreign exchange trading, and seek advice from an independent financial or tax advisor if you have any questions.
In forex, investors use leverage to profit from the fluctuations in exchange rates between two different countries. The leverage that is achievable in the forex market is one of the highest that investors can obtain. Leverage is activated through a loan that is provided to an investor by the broker that is handling the investor’s or trader’s forex account.
Charts are categorized according to the way price action is depicted as well as the time frame of the period being examined. Imagine that we have a 4-hourly candlestick chart of the EURUSD pair. This means that each candlestick on the graph presents the price data of a four-hour long period in a compact form. What happens inside that time period is irrelevant. If we had chosen an hourly chart, each candlestick on the chart above would be replaced by four different candlesticks.
Once you begin trading with a certain FX broker, you may want to modify the leverage available to you. This depends on the broker. With Admiral Markets you can use an industry standardised procedure that includes authenticating to the Trader's Room, selecting your account, and changing the leverage available. This action takes immediate effect, so be careful if you have open positions when you attempt to reduce your leverage.
Charts are the keys that allow us to unlock the secrets of forex trading. The subject covers a vast ground, and only by continuous practice can we expect to acquire the necessity fluency and expertise in evaluating them. The language of forex charts is really the language of currency trading. It will take some time to learn it, but when you are a native speaker, so to speak, your imagination and creativity are the only limits to your potential.
For example, you might think the Euro (EUR) is going to increase in value against the Australian dollar (AUD) so you could place a trade to buy the EUR/AUD currency pair. If the Euro rises you would make a profit; if it drops you would incur a loss. Conversely, if you thought the Euro was going to decrease in value you could place a trade that would benefit from that price movement.
The carry trade opportunity was also seen in USD/JPY in 2005. Between January and December of that year, the currency rallied from 102 to a high of 121.40 before ending at 117.80. This is equal to an appreciation from low to high of 19%, which was far more attractive than the 2.9% return in the S&P 500 during that same year. In addition, at the time, the interest rate spread between the U.S. dollar and the Japanese yen averaged around 3.25%. Unleveraged, this means that a trader could have earned as much as 22.25% over the course of the year. Introduce 10:1 leverage, and that could be as much as 220% gain.

Clearly, leverage should be used judiciously, but even with relatively conservative 10:1 leverage, the 7.5% yield on NZD/JPY pair would translate into a 75% return on an annual basis. So, if you were to hold a 100,000 unit position in NZD/JPY using $5,000 worth of equity, you would earn $9.40 in interest every day. That’s $94 dollars in interest after only 10 days, $940 worth of interest after three months, or $3,760 annually. Not too shabby given the fact that the same amount of money would only earn you $250 in a bank savings account (with a rate of 5% interest) after a whole year. The only real edge the bank account provides is that the $250 return would be risk-free. 
This is why many traders decide to employ gearing, also known as financial leverage, in their trading - so that the size of the trading position and profits could be higher. Let's assume a trader with 1,000 USD on their account balance wants to trade big and their broker is supplying a leverage of 1:500. This way a trader can open a position that is as large as 5 lots, when it is denominated in USD. In other words, 1,000 USD * 500 (the leverage), would equal a maximum size of 500,000 USD for the position. The trader can actually request their orders of 500 times the size of his deposit to be filled.
Although the ability to earn significant profits by using leverage is substantial, leverage can also work against investors. For example, if the currency underlying one of your trades moves in the opposite direction of what you believed would happen, leverage will greatly amplify the potential losses. To avoid a catastrophe, forex traders usually implement a strict trading style that includes the use of stop orders and limit orders designed to control potential losses.
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When you trade in the foreign exchange spot market (where trading happens immediately or on the spot), you are actually buying and selling two underlying currencies. All currencies are quoted in pairs, because each currency is valued in relation to another. For example, if the EUR/USD pair is quoted as 1.2200 that means it takes $1.22 to purchase one euro. 
Currencies are traded on the Foreign Exchange market, also known as Forex. This is a decentralized market that spans the globe and is considered the largest by trading volume and the most liquid worldwide. Exchange rates fluctuate continuously due to the ever changing market forces of supply and demand. Forex traders buy a currency pair if they think the exchange rate will rise and sell it if they think the opposite will happen. The Forex market remains open around the world for 24 hours a day with the exception of weekends.
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