Between 2003 and the end of 2004, the AUD/USD currency pair offered a positive yield spread of 2.5%. Although this may seem very small, the return would become 25% with the use of 10:1 leverage. During that same time, the Australian dollar also rallied from 56 cents to close at 80 cents against the U.S. dollar, which represented a 42% appreciation in the currency pair. This means that if you were in this trade – and many hedge funds at the time were – you would have not only earned the positive yield, but you would have also seen tremendous capital gains in your underlying investment. 


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Leverage simply allows traders to control larger positions with a smaller amount of actual trading funds. In the case of 50:1 leverage (or 2% margin required), for example, $1 in a trading account can control a position worth $50. As a result, leveraged trading can be a "double-edged sword" in that both potential profits as well as potential losses are magnified according to the degree of leverage used.
Risk Disclosure: Trading in financial instruments and/or cryptocurrencies involves high risks including the risk of losing some, or all, of your investment amount, and may not be suitable for all investors. Prices of cryptocurrencies are extremely volatile and may be affected by external factors such as financial, regulatory or political events. Trading on margin increases the financial risks.
In contrast, when a trader opens a position that is expected to last for a few minutes or even seconds, they are mainly aiming to extract the maximum amount of profit within a limited time. What is the best forex leveraging in this case? Usually such a person would be aiming to employ high, or in some cases, the highest possible leverage to assure the largest profit is realised, while trading small market fluctuations.

Many traders define leverage as a credit line that a broker provides to their client. This isn't exactly true, as leverage does not have the features that are issued together with credit. First of all, when you are trading with leverage you are not expected to pay any credit back. You are simply obliged to close your position, or keep it open before it is closed by the margin call. In other words, there is no particular deadline for settling your leverage boost provided by the broker.
My details: (1) Entry @ 0.68310 (Sell Limit) (2) Stop loss @ 0.68370 (6 pips) (3) Target @ 0.68190 (18 pips) - Closing 90% - S/L @ break-even (4) R:R = 1:3 min. Stay tuned for the updates Follow and leave a like if you liked this idea and want to see more! *DISCLAIMER* This post is solely for educational purposes and does not constitute any form of investment...
Between 2003 and the end of 2004, the AUD/USD currency pair offered a positive yield spread of 2.5%. Although this may seem very small, the return would become 25% with the use of 10:1 leverage. During that same time, the Australian dollar also rallied from 56 cents to close at 80 cents against the U.S. dollar, which represented a 42% appreciation in the currency pair. This means that if you were in this trade – and many hedge funds at the time were – you would have not only earned the positive yield, but you would have also seen tremendous capital gains in your underlying investment. 
Trading foreign exchange on margin carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. The high degree of leverage can work against you as well as for you. Before deciding to trade foreign exchange you should carefully consider your investment objectives, level of experience and risk appetite. The possibility exists that you could sustain a loss of some or all of your initial investment and therefore you should not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. You should be aware of all the risks associated with foreign exchange trading and seek advice from an independent financial advisor if you have any doubts.
From this we can see that the Forex leverage ratio strongly depends on the strategy that is going to be used. To give you a better overview, scalpers and breakout traders try to use as high a leverage as possible, as they usually look for quick trades. Positional traders often trade with low leverage or none at all. A desired leverage for a positional trader usually starts at 5:1 and goes up to about 20:1.
With Equivolume, you can plot price and volume activity on a single graph, instead of having volume added as an indicator on the side. This tool draws the bars following their traded volume at a precise point in time (the wider the bar, the bigger the volume). That creates a clear visualization of the volume increase or decrease of an asset’s diagram. A very handy feature for those strategies whose key factor is volume. How to change your table into Equivolume 
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