High Risk Investment Warning: Trading FX/CFDs on margin carries a high level of risk, and may not be suitable for all investors. Leverage can work against you. Before deciding to trade FX/CFDs offered by FXCM Australia Pty. Limited ("FXCM AU" or "FXCM Australia") you should carefully consider your objectives, financial situation, needs, and level of experience. By trading, you could sustain a loss in excess of your deposited funds. Before trading FX/CFDs you should be aware of all the risks associated with trading FXCM products and read and consider the Financial Services Guide, Product Disclosure Statement, and Terms of Business issued by FXCM AU. FX/CFDs products are only suitable for those customers who fully understand the market risk. FXCM provides general advice that does not take into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. The content of this website must not be construed as personal advice. FXCM recommends you seek advice from a separate financial advisor. For any questions or to obtain a copy of any documents, contact FXCM at [email protected] FXCM AU is regulated by ASIC [AFSL 309763]. FXCM AU ACN: 121934432.

Leverage simply allows traders to control larger positions with a smaller amount of actual trading funds. In the case of 50:1 leverage (or 2% margin required), for example, $1 in a trading account can control a position worth $50. As a result, leveraged trading can be a "double-edged sword" in that both potential profits as well as potential losses are magnified according to the degree of leverage used.
Our Interactive plot offers you indicators to detect patterns on Japanese Candlesticks (see the list of Candlestick Patterns below). It’s a recommended tool for those traders that use Candlesticks to take trading decisions. This tool is very useful to get an immediate notification being displayed as soon as the pattern occurs. The Japanese candlestick theory establishes a series of patterns which are statistically previous to potential change or interruption of trends, a turning point in a current trend, etc.
The carry trade opportunity was also seen in USD/JPY in 2005. Between January and December of that year, the currency rallied from 102 to a high of 121.40 before ending at 117.80. This is equal to an appreciation from low to high of 19%, which was far more attractive than the 2.9% return in the S&P 500 during that same year. In addition, at the time, the interest rate spread between the U.S. dollar and the Japanese yen averaged around 3.25%. Unleveraged, this means that a trader could have earned as much as 22.25% over the course of the year. Introduce 10:1 leverage, and that could be as much as 220% gain.
All forex trades involve two currencies because you're betting on the value of a currency against another. Think of EUR/USD, the most-traded currency pair in the world. EUR, the first currency in the pair, is the base, and USD, the second, is the counter. When you see a price quoted on your platform, that price is how much one euro is worth in US dollars. You always see two prices because one is the buy price and one is the sell. The difference between the two is the spread. When you click buy or sell, you are buying or selling the first currency in the pair.
Live Spreads Widget: Dynamic live spreads are available on Active Trader commission-based accounts. When static spreads are displayed, the figures are time-weighted averages derived from tradable prices at FXCM from July 1, 2019 to September 30, 2019. Spreads are variable and are subject to delay. The spread figures are for informational purposes only. FXCM is not liable for errors, omissions or delays, or for actions relying on this information.
Between 2003 and the end of 2004, the AUD/USD currency pair offered a positive yield spread of 2.5%. Although this may seem very small, the return would become 25% with the use of 10:1 leverage. During that same time, the Australian dollar also rallied from 56 cents to close at 80 cents against the U.S. dollar, which represented a 42% appreciation in the currency pair. This means that if you were in this trade – and many hedge funds at the time were – you would have not only earned the positive yield, but you would have also seen tremendous capital gains in your underlying investment. 
Risk Disclaimer: DailyForex will not be held liable for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on the information contained within this website including market news, analysis, trading signals and Forex broker reviews. The data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate, and analyses are the opinions of the author and do not represent the recommendations of DailyForex or its employees. Currency trading on margin involves high risk, and is not suitable for all investors. As a leveraged product losses are able to exceed initial deposits and capital is at risk. Before deciding to trade Forex or any other financial instrument you should carefully consider your investment objectives, level of experience, and risk appetite. We work hard to offer you valuable information about all of the brokers that we review. In order to provide you with this free service we receive advertising fees from brokers, including some of those listed within our rankings and on this page. While we do our utmost to ensure that all our data is up-to-date, we encourage you to verify our information with the broker directly.
When scalping, traders tend to employ a leverage that starts at 50:1 and may go as high as 500:1. Knowing the effect of leveraging and the optimal leverage Forex trading ratio is vital for a successful trading strategy, as you never want to overtrade, but you always want to be able to squeeze the maximum out of potentially profitable trades. Usually a trader is advised to experiment with leverage within their strategy for a while, in order to find the most suitable one.
My details: (1) Entry @ 0.68310 (Sell Limit) (2) Stop loss @ 0.68370 (6 pips) (3) Target @ 0.68190 (18 pips) - Closing 90% - S/L @ break-even (4) R:R = 1:3 min. Stay tuned for the updates Follow and leave a like if you liked this idea and want to see more! *DISCLAIMER* This post is solely for educational purposes and does not constitute any form of investment...

To trade $100,000 of currency, with a margin of 1%, an investor will only have to deposit $1,000 into her or his margin account. The leverage provided on a trade like this is 100:1. Leverage of this size is significantly larger than the 2:1 leverage commonly provided on equities and the 15:1 leverage provided in the futures market. Although 100:1 leverage may seem extremely risky, the risk is significantly less when you consider that currency prices usually change by less than 1% during intraday trading (trading within one day). If currencies fluctuated as much as equities, brokers would not be able to provide as much leverage.

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