Many traders define leverage as a credit line that a broker provides to their client. This isn't exactly true, as leverage does not have the features that are issued together with credit. First of all, when you are trading with leverage you are not expected to pay any credit back. You are simply obliged to close your position, or keep it open before it is closed by the margin call. In other words, there is no particular deadline for settling your leverage boost provided by the broker.
Please support this idea with LIKE if you find it useful. Initiate Long. Entry - 1.03340 TP1 - 1.13378 TP2 - 1.20148 TP3 - 1.26684 SL - 1.00072 Reason: Despite I provide a Long position here, we should be ready to both breakouts, because of Triangles are not bullish/bearish patterns. First scenario is shown on the Chart in case the Resistance broken position...
To trade $100,000 of currency, with a margin of 1%, an investor will only have to deposit $1,000 into her or his margin account. The leverage provided on a trade like this is 100:1. Leverage of this size is significantly larger than the 2:1 leverage commonly provided on equities and the 15:1 leverage provided in the futures market. Although 100:1 leverage may seem extremely risky, the risk is significantly less when you consider that currency prices usually change by less than 1% during intraday trading (trading within one day). If currencies fluctuated as much as equities, brokers would not be able to provide as much leverage.
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