It’s easy for new traders to spend a lot of time researching which trading platform to use or looking for the latest technological solution. The reality is a new trader doesn’t really know what they are going to need until they uncover their trading style. This means it’s better to begin with the basics and focus on learning enough to get started with a minimum of risk.

Let's say a trader has 1,000 USD on their trading account. A regular lot of '1' on MetaTrader 4 is equal to 100,000 currency units. As it is possible to trade mini and even micro lots with Admiral Markets, a deposit this size would allow a trader to open micro lots (0.01 of a single lot or 1,000 currency units) with no leverage put in place. However, as a trader would usually be looking for around 2% return per trade, it could only be equal to 20 USD.
Forex trading involves the sale of a currency, and the simultaneous purchase of another with the purpose of closing the position at a later time with a profit. Unlike in the stock or commodities markets where prices are routinely quoted in USD, the price of a currency can be quoted in any other currency due to the essentially bartering nature of currency transactions where live, as well as historical, forex charts are used to identify trends and entry/exit points for trades.

If you're feeling inspired to start trading, or this article has provided some extra insight to your existing trading knowledge, you may be pleased to know that Admiral Markets provides the ability to trade with Forex and CFDs on up to 80+ currencies, with the latest market updates and technical analysis provided for FREE! Click the banner below to open your live account today!
Currency values never remain stationary, and it is this dynamic that gave birth to one of the most popular trading strategies of all time, the carry trade. Carry traders hope to earn not only the interest rate differential between the two currencies (discussed above), but also look for their positions to appreciate in value. There have been plenty of opportunities for big profits in the past. Let’s take a look at some historical examples. 
The forex market is the most liquid and active market in the world. At every single second an enormous amount of transactions gets executed, with the total daily turnover being regularly estimated to reach trillions of dollars. If we did not make use of an analytical tool such as a forex chart to place the data into a more compact form where it can be visually examined and analyzed, we would be in possession of a vast sea of difficult to interpret numbers. The forex trading chart, then, is a visual aid that makes the recognition of trends, and patterns in general easier, and makes the application of technical tools of analysis at all possible.
A single pound on Monday could get you 1.19 euros. On Tuesday, 1.20 euros. This tiny change may not seem like a big deal. But think of it on a bigger scale. A large international company may need to pay overseas employees. Imagine what that could do to the bottom line if, like in the example above, simply exchanging one currency for another costs you more depending on when you do it? These few pennies add up quickly. In both cases, you—as a traveler or a business owner—may want to hold your money until the forex exchange rate is more favorable.
From this we can see that the Forex leverage ratio strongly depends on the strategy that is going to be used. To give you a better overview, scalpers and breakout traders try to use as high a leverage as possible, as they usually look for quick trades. Positional traders often trade with low leverage or none at all. A desired leverage for a positional trader usually starts at 5:1 and goes up to about 20:1.
In every foreign exchange transaction, you are simultaneously buying one currency and selling another. In effect, you are using the proceeds from the currency you sold to purchase the currency you are buying. Furthermore, every currency in the world comes attached with an interest rate set by the central bank of that currency's country. You are obligated to pay the interest on the currency that you have sold, but you also have the privilege of earning interest on the currency that you have bought. For example, let’s look at the New Zealand dollar/Japanese yen pair (NZD/JPY). Let’s assume that New Zealand has an interest rate of 8% and that Japan has an interest rate of 0.5% In the currency market, interest rates are calculated in basis points. A basis point is simply 1/100th of 1%. So, New Zealand rates are 800 basis points and Japanese rates are 50 basis points. If you decide to go long NZD/JPY you will earn 8% in annualized interest, but have to pay 0.5% for a net return of 7.5%, or 750 basis points.
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