Charts are categorized according to the way price action is depicted as well as the time frame of the period being examined. Imagine that we have a 4-hourly candlestick chart of the EURUSD pair. This means that each candlestick on the graph presents the price data of a four-hour long period in a compact form. What happens inside that time period is irrelevant. If we had chosen an hourly chart, each candlestick on the chart above would be replaced by four different candlesticks.

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For example, you might think the Euro (EUR) is going to increase in value against the Australian dollar (AUD) so you could place a trade to buy the EUR/AUD currency pair. If the Euro rises you would make a profit; if it drops you would incur a loss. Conversely, if you thought the Euro was going to decrease in value you could place a trade that would benefit from that price movement.
In every foreign exchange transaction, you are simultaneously buying one currency and selling another. In effect, you are using the proceeds from the currency you sold to purchase the currency you are buying. Furthermore, every currency in the world comes attached with an interest rate set by the central bank of that currency's country. You are obligated to pay the interest on the currency that you have sold, but you also have the privilege of earning interest on the currency that you have bought. For example, let’s look at the New Zealand dollar/Japanese yen pair (NZD/JPY). Let’s assume that New Zealand has an interest rate of 8% and that Japan has an interest rate of 0.5% In the currency market, interest rates are calculated in basis points. A basis point is simply 1/100th of 1%. So, New Zealand rates are 800 basis points and Japanese rates are 50 basis points. If you decide to go long NZD/JPY you will earn 8% in annualized interest, but have to pay 0.5% for a net return of 7.5%, or 750 basis points.
We offer a tool to compare graphs so you can analyze the price history of two assets and analyze relative performance over a period of time. When you click on “Compare”, you can choose the second asset (currency, equity or index). The graph of both assets will be displayed in the same table, with the percentage of deviation in the left vertical axis. The starting point of both lines is zero. For a clearer view, it’s recommended to choose the “line” type. You can edit the color and weight of each currency. How to compare assets
Another tool you can use is our significative line crossing systems, including crossing averages, MACD cross and over zero signal. Such as the indicators that detect patterns in Japanese Candlesticks (see above), the correct selection of your parameters are vital to avoid to be guided in your decisions by misleading signals. How to add crosses indicators
Good morning Traders! No change from our point of view, the pair developed the expected potential rally approaching the first resistance. That said, our idea still remains valid as shown in the previous analysis (see Part.2 below) and we would like to see a spike on the weekly chart (see Part 1 analysis). DAILY ANALYSIS (Part. 2) (click and play on chart...
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