Before the Internet revolution only large players such as international banks, hedge funds and extremely wealthy individuals could participate. Now retail traders can buy, sell and speculate on currencies from the comfort of their homes with a mouse click through online brokerage accounts. There are many tradable currency pairs and an average online broker has about 40. One of our most popular chats is the Forex chat where traders talk in real-time about where the market is going.
A single pound on Monday could get you 1.19 euros. On Tuesday, 1.20 euros. This tiny change may not seem like a big deal. But think of it on a bigger scale. A large international company may need to pay overseas employees. Imagine what that could do to the bottom line if, like in the example above, simply exchanging one currency for another costs you more depending on when you do it? These few pennies add up quickly. In both cases, you—as a traveler or a business owner—may want to hold your money until the forex exchange rate is more favorable.
Just like stocks, you can trade currency based on what you think its value is (or where it's headed). But the big difference with forex is that you can trade up or down just as easily. If you think a currency will increase in value, you can buy it. If you think it will decrease, you can sell it. With a market this large, finding a buyer when you're selling and a seller when you're buying is much easier than in other markets. Maybe you hear on the news that China is devaluing its currency to draw more foreign business into its country. If you think that trend will continue, you could make a forex trade by selling the Chinese currency against another currency, say, the US dollar. The more the Chinese currency devalues against the US dollar, the higher your profits. If the Chinese currency increases in value while you have your sell position open, then your losses increase and you want to get out of the trade.
Trading leverage or leveraged trading allows you to control much larger amounts in a trade, with a minimal deposit in your account. Leveraged trading is also known as margin trading. You can open up a small account with a brokerage, and then essentially borrow money from the broker to open a large position. This allows traders to magnify the amount of profits earned.
Leverage in finance pertains to the use of debt to buy assets. This is done in order to avoid using too much equity. The ratio of this debt to equity is the formula for leverage (debt/equity ratio) whereby the greater the proportion of debt, the higher the amount of leverage. If a company, investment or property is termed as "highly leveraged" it means that it has a greater proportion of debt than equity. When leveraged debt is used in such a way that the return generated is greater than the interest associated with it, then an investor is in a favourable position.
Charts are categorized according to the way price action is depicted as well as the time frame of the period being examined. Imagine that we have a 4-hourly candlestick chart of the EURUSD pair. This means that each candlestick on the graph presents the price data of a four-hour long period in a compact form. What happens inside that time period is irrelevant. If we had chosen an hourly chart, each candlestick on the chart above would be replaced by four different candlesticks.
Demo Account: Although demo accounts attempt to replicate real markets, they operate in a simulated market environment. As such, there are key differences that distinguish them from real accounts; including but not limited to, the lack of dependence on real-time market liquidity, a delay in pricing, and the availability of some products which may not be tradable on live accounts. The operational capabilities when executing orders in a demo environment may result in atypically, expedited transactions; lack of rejected orders; and/or the absence of slippage. There may be instances where margin requirements differ from those of live accounts as updates to demo accounts may not always coincide with those of real accounts.
Between 2003 and the end of 2004, the AUD/USD currency pair offered a positive yield spread of 2.5%. Although this may seem very small, the return would become 25% with the use of 10:1 leverage. During that same time, the Australian dollar also rallied from 56 cents to close at 80 cents against the U.S. dollar, which represented a 42% appreciation in the currency pair. This means that if you were in this trade – and many hedge funds at the time were – you would have not only earned the positive yield, but you would have also seen tremendous capital gains in your underlying investment. 

My details: (1) Entry @ 0.68310 (Sell Limit) (2) Stop loss @ 0.68370 (6 pips) (3) Target @ 0.68190 (18 pips) - Closing 90% - S/L @ break-even (4) R:R = 1:3 min. Stay tuned for the updates Follow and leave a like if you liked this idea and want to see more! *DISCLAIMER* This post is solely for educational purposes and does not constitute any form of investment...
When scalping, traders tend to employ a leverage that starts at 50:1 and may go as high as 500:1. Knowing the effect of leveraging and the optimal leverage Forex trading ratio is vital for a successful trading strategy, as you never want to overtrade, but you always want to be able to squeeze the maximum out of potentially profitable trades. Usually a trader is advised to experiment with leverage within their strategy for a while, in order to find the most suitable one.
We hope that this article has been useful to you, and that by now you have clearly understood the nature of gearing, how to calculate Forex leverage, and how it can be equally be useful or harmful to your trading strategy. It is important to state that leveraged Forex trading is quite a risky process, and your deposit can be lost quickly if you are trading using a large leverage. Do try to avoid any leveraged or highly leveraged trading before you have gained enough experience.
This way, if 1:500 leverage is used, a trader would be making 500 USD instead of 1 USD. It is of course important to state that a trader can lose the funds as quickly as it is possible to gain them. Now as we have understood the definition and a practical example of leverage, let's take a more detailed look at its application, and find out what the best possible level of gearing in FX trading is. Admiral Markets offers varying leverages which are dependent on client status via Admiral Markets Pro terms.

Financial leverage is essentially an account boost for Forex traders. With the help of forex leveraging, a trader can open orders as large as 1,000 times greater than their own capital. In other words, leverage is a way for traders to gain access to much larger volumes than they would initially be able to trade with. More and more traders are deciding to move into the FX (Forex, also known as the Foreign Exchange Market) market every day.


When you trade in the foreign exchange spot market (where trading happens immediately or on the spot), you are actually buying and selling two underlying currencies. All currencies are quoted in pairs, because each currency is valued in relation to another. For example, if the EUR/USD pair is quoted as 1.2200 that means it takes $1.22 to purchase one euro. 
In addition, there is also no interest on leverage, instead, FX Swaps are usually what it takes to transfer your position overnight. However, unlike regular loans, the swap payments can also be profitable for a trader. To sum up, leverage is a tool that increases the size of the maximum position that can be opened by a trader. Now we have a better understanding of Forex trading leverage, let's see how it works with an example.
While a margin amount of only 1/50th of the actual trade size is required from the trader to open this trade, however, any profit or loss on the trade would correspond to the full $100,000 leveraged amount. In the case of USD/CAD at the current market price, this would be a profit or loss of around $10 per one-pip move in price. This illustrates the magnification of profit and loss when trading positions are leveraged with the use of margin.

Since currencies are traded in pairs, it’s impractical and not very useful to draw a pure USD currency chart. Instead we have the option of drawing (or rather having the software plot for us) a chart of the USDJPY pair, or the AUDUSD pair, since it is only possible to quote a currency in terms of another. On the other hand, there are some forex charts that take weighted average of such currency pairs to derive an overall index for a currency. The famous USD index, is a good example.
The bottom line is that you want to pick carry trades that benefit not only from a positive and growing yield, but that also have the potential to appreciate in value. This is important because just as currency appreciation can increase the value of your carry trade earnings, currency depreciation can erase all of your carry trade gains – and then some. 
It is hard to determine the best level one should use, as it mainly depends on the trader's strategy and the actual vision of upcoming market moves. As a rule of thumb, the longer you expect to keep your position open, the smaller the leverage should be. This would be logical, as long positions are usually opened when large market moves are expected. However, when you are looking for a long lasting position, you will want to avoid being 'Stopped Out' due to market fluctuations.
Trading leverage or leveraged trading allows you to control much larger amounts in a trade, with a minimal deposit in your account. Leveraged trading is also known as margin trading. You can open up a small account with a brokerage, and then essentially borrow money from the broker to open a large position. This allows traders to magnify the amount of profits earned.
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