Since currencies are traded in pairs, it’s impractical and not very useful to draw a pure USD currency chart. Instead we have the option of drawing (or rather having the software plot for us) a chart of the USDJPY pair, or the AUDUSD pair, since it is only possible to quote a currency in terms of another. On the other hand, there are some forex charts that take weighted average of such currency pairs to derive an overall index for a currency. The famous USD index, is a good example.
Leveraged trading in foreign currency or off-exchange products on margin carries significant risk and may not be suitable for all investors. We advise you to carefully consider whether trading is appropriate for you based on your personal circumstances. Forex trading involves risk. Losses can exceed deposits. We recommend that you seek independent advice and ensure you fully understand the risks involved before trading.

When you trade forex, you're effectively borrowing the first currency in the pair to buy or sell the second currency. With a US$5-trillion-a-day market, the liquidity is so deep that liquidity providers—the big banks, basically—allow you to trade with leverage. To trade with leverage, you simply set aside the required margin for your trade size. If you're trading 200:1 leverage, for example, you can trade $2,000 in the market while only setting aside $10 in margin in your trading account. For 50:1 leverage, the same trade size would still only require about £40 in margin. This gives you much more exposure, while keeping your capital investment down.
Currency values never remain stationary, and it is this dynamic that gave birth to one of the most popular trading strategies of all time, the carry trade. Carry traders hope to earn not only the interest rate differential between the two currencies (discussed above), but also look for their positions to appreciate in value. There have been plenty of opportunities for big profits in the past. Let’s take a look at some historical examples. 
Currency values never remain stationary, and it is this dynamic that gave birth to one of the most popular trading strategies of all time, the carry trade. Carry traders hope to earn not only the interest rate differential between the two currencies (discussed above), but also look for their positions to appreciate in value. There have been plenty of opportunities for big profits in the past. Let’s take a look at some historical examples. 
GBPJPY is the most confusing one in all the JPY-related pairs. It seems that very hard for it to rise up to last top on weekly chart. It closed with a weak warning bearish weekly signal last week. On this daily chart, it could drop down more after breaking through the blue short-term daily trend line. And the 3rd wave could drop down to next support which is also...
This way, if 1:500 leverage is used, a trader would be making 500 USD instead of 1 USD. It is of course important to state that a trader can lose the funds as quickly as it is possible to gain them. Now as we have understood the definition and a practical example of leverage, let's take a more detailed look at its application, and find out what the best possible level of gearing in FX trading is. Admiral Markets offers varying leverages which are dependent on client status via Admiral Markets Pro terms.

Map out the magnitude of price moves with Retracements and Arcs. These tools let you draw studies about the possible developments of a price based on its previous move. It can be calculated following different mathematical concepts (Fibonacci, Gann…). While retracements are concerned with just the magnitude of moves, Arcs factor both magnitude and time, offering areas of future support or resistance that will move as time progresses. How to add Retracements and Arcs


Currencies are traded on the Foreign Exchange market, also known as Forex. This is a decentralized market that spans the globe and is considered the largest by trading volume and the most liquid worldwide. Exchange rates fluctuate continuously due to the ever changing market forces of supply and demand. Forex traders buy a currency pair if they think the exchange rate will rise and sell it if they think the opposite will happen. The Forex market remains open around the world for 24 hours a day with the exception of weekends.
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