When a trader decides to trade in the forex market, he or she must first open a margin account with a forex broker. Usually, the amount of leverage provided is either 50:1, 100:1 or 200:1, depending on the broker and the size of the position that the investor is trading. What does this mean? A 50:1 leverage ratio means that the minimum margin requirement for the trader is 1/50 = 2%. A 100:1 ratio means that the trader is required to have at least 1/100 = 1% of the total value of trade available as cash in the trading account, and so on. Standard trading is done on 100,000 units of currency, so for a trade of this size, the leverage provided is usually 50:1 or 100:1. Leverage of 200:1 is usually used for positions of $50,000 or less.

If you are a rookie trader, you may find yourself asking questions such as 'what is leverage in Forex trading?' and 'how can it be useful?' This article will provide you with answers to these types of questions, together with, a detailed overview of Forex leveraging, its advantages and disadvantages, and a list of possible applications and restrictions.
There is a high level of risk associated with trading foreign exchange on margin and it may not be appropriate for all types of investors. The high degree of leverage can either work for you or against you. Before you decide to invest in foreign exchange, it is recommended to carefully assess your investment goals, experience level, and your desired amount of risk. No information or opinion stated on this site should be considered a solicitation or offer to buy or sell any currency, equity, or other financial products or services. Past performance does not predict or guarantee future performance. CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. Between 74-89% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs. You should consider whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money. Read our legal disclaimer.

High Risk Investment Warning: Trading FX/CFDs on margin carries a high level of risk, and may not be suitable for all investors. Leverage can work against you. Before deciding to trade FX/CFDs offered by FXCM Australia Pty. Limited ("FXCM AU" or "FXCM Australia") you should carefully consider your objectives, financial situation, needs, and level of experience. By trading, you could sustain a loss in excess of your deposited funds. Before trading FX/CFDs you should be aware of all the risks associated with trading FXCM products and read and consider the Financial Services Guide, Product Disclosure Statement, and Terms of Business issued by FXCM AU. FX/CFDs products are only suitable for those customers who fully understand the market risk. FXCM provides general advice that does not take into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. The content of this website must not be construed as personal advice. FXCM recommends you seek advice from a separate financial advisor. For any questions or to obtain a copy of any documents, contact FXCM at [email protected] FXCM AU is regulated by ASIC [AFSL 309763]. FXCM AU ACN: 121934432.

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Let's say a trader has 1,000 USD on their trading account. A regular lot of '1' on MetaTrader 4 is equal to 100,000 currency units. As it is possible to trade mini and even micro lots with Admiral Markets, a deposit this size would allow a trader to open micro lots (0.01 of a single lot or 1,000 currency units) with no leverage put in place. However, as a trader would usually be looking for around 2% return per trade, it could only be equal to 20 USD.
Between 2003 and the end of 2004, the AUD/USD currency pair offered a positive yield spread of 2.5%. Although this may seem very small, the return would become 25% with the use of 10:1 leverage. During that same time, the Australian dollar also rallied from 56 cents to close at 80 cents against the U.S. dollar, which represented a 42% appreciation in the currency pair. This means that if you were in this trade – and many hedge funds at the time were – you would have not only earned the positive yield, but you would have also seen tremendous capital gains in your underlying investment. 
My details: (1) Entry @ 0.68310 (Sell Limit) (2) Stop loss @ 0.68370 (6 pips) (3) Target @ 0.68190 (18 pips) - Closing 90% - S/L @ break-even (4) R:R = 1:3 min. Stay tuned for the updates Follow and leave a like if you liked this idea and want to see more! *DISCLAIMER* This post is solely for educational purposes and does not constitute any form of investment...
Just like stocks, you can trade currency based on what you think its value is (or where it's headed). But the big difference with forex is that you can trade up or down just as easily. If you think a currency will increase in value, you can buy it. If you think it will decrease, you can sell it. With a market this large, finding a buyer when you're selling and a seller when you're buying is much easier than in other markets. Maybe you hear on the news that China is devaluing its currency to draw more foreign business into its country. If you think that trend will continue, you could make a forex trade by selling the Chinese currency against another currency, say, the US dollar. The more the Chinese currency devalues against the US dollar, the higher your profits. If the Chinese currency increases in value while you have your sell position open, then your losses increase and you want to get out of the trade.

Clearly, leverage should be used judiciously, but even with relatively conservative 10:1 leverage, the 7.5% yield on NZD/JPY pair would translate into a 75% return on an annual basis. So, if you were to hold a 100,000 unit position in NZD/JPY using $5,000 worth of equity, you would earn $9.40 in interest every day. That’s $94 dollars in interest after only 10 days, $940 worth of interest after three months, or $3,760 annually. Not too shabby given the fact that the same amount of money would only earn you $250 in a bank savings account (with a rate of 5% interest) after a whole year. The only real edge the bank account provides is that the $250 return would be risk-free. 


When a trader decides to trade in the forex market, he or she must first open a margin account with a forex broker. Usually, the amount of leverage provided is either 50:1, 100:1 or 200:1, depending on the broker and the size of the position that the investor is trading. What does this mean? A 50:1 leverage ratio means that the minimum margin requirement for the trader is 1/50 = 2%. A 100:1 ratio means that the trader is required to have at least 1/100 = 1% of the total value of trade available as cash in the trading account, and so on. Standard trading is done on 100,000 units of currency, so for a trade of this size, the leverage provided is usually 50:1 or 100:1. Leverage of 200:1 is usually used for positions of $50,000 or less.
Clearly, leverage should be used judiciously, but even with relatively conservative 10:1 leverage, the 7.5% yield on NZD/JPY pair would translate into a 75% return on an annual basis. So, if you were to hold a 100,000 unit position in NZD/JPY using $5,000 worth of equity, you would earn $9.40 in interest every day. That’s $94 dollars in interest after only 10 days, $940 worth of interest after three months, or $3,760 annually. Not too shabby given the fact that the same amount of money would only earn you $250 in a bank savings account (with a rate of 5% interest) after a whole year. The only real edge the bank account provides is that the $250 return would be risk-free. 
Please support this idea with LIKE if you find it useful. Initiate Long. Entry - 1.03340 TP1 - 1.13378 TP2 - 1.20148 TP3 - 1.26684 SL - 1.00072 Reason: Despite I provide a Long position here, we should be ready to both breakouts, because of Triangles are not bullish/bearish patterns. First scenario is shown on the Chart in case the Resistance broken position...

Investing in CMC Markets derivative products carries significant risks and is not suitable for all investors. You could lose more than your deposits. You do not own, or have any interest in, the underlying assets. We recommend that you seek independent advice and ensure you fully understand the risks involved before trading. Spreads may widen dependent on liquidity and market volatility.
In contrast, when a trader opens a position that is expected to last for a few minutes or even seconds, they are mainly aiming to extract the maximum amount of profit within a limited time. What is the best forex leveraging in this case? Usually such a person would be aiming to employ high, or in some cases, the highest possible leverage to assure the largest profit is realised, while trading small market fluctuations.
With Equivolume, you can plot price and volume activity on a single graph, instead of having volume added as an indicator on the side. This tool draws the bars following their traded volume at a precise point in time (the wider the bar, the bigger the volume). That creates a clear visualization of the volume increase or decrease of an asset’s diagram. A very handy feature for those strategies whose key factor is volume. How to change your table into Equivolume
High Risk Investment Warning: Trading FX/CFDs on margin carries a high level of risk, and may not be suitable for all investors. Leverage can work against you. Before deciding to trade FX/CFDs offered by FXCM Australia Pty. Limited ("FXCM AU" or "FXCM Australia") you should carefully consider your objectives, financial situation, needs, and level of experience. By trading, you could sustain a loss in excess of your deposited funds. Before trading FX/CFDs you should be aware of all the risks associated with trading FXCM products and read and consider the Financial Services Guide, Product Disclosure Statement, and Terms of Business issued by FXCM AU. FX/CFDs products are only suitable for those customers who fully understand the market risk. FXCM provides general advice that does not take into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. The content of this website must not be construed as personal advice. FXCM recommends you seek advice from a separate financial advisor. For any questions or to obtain a copy of any documents, contact FXCM at [email protected] FXCM AU is regulated by ASIC [AFSL 309763]. FXCM AU ACN: 121934432.
GBPJPY is the most confusing one in all the JPY-related pairs. It seems that very hard for it to rise up to last top on weekly chart. It closed with a weak warning bearish weekly signal last week. On this daily chart, it could drop down more after breaking through the blue short-term daily trend line. And the 3rd wave could drop down to next support which is also...
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